Another epic article first published in 2009 and updated for this post in August 2014.


This is the first time that the Horsham Photographer featured every property in a road, and this is a road that merits that attention. Recognised over one hundred years ago as the best in England, see quote below from Highways and Byways in Sussex by E V Lucas, it remains unspoilt to this day. This feature sets out to record the road as was in March 2009.

‘There is in England no more peaceful and prosperous row of venerable homes than the Causeway, joining Carfax and the church, with its pollarded limes and chestnuts in line on the pavement’s edge, its graceful gables, jutting eaves, and glimpses of green gardens through the doors and windows. The sweetest part of Horsham is there.’

Highways and Byways in Sussex by E V Lucas
Highways and Byways in Sussex by E V LucasThe Causeway in Horsham is perhaps the most photographed of any of the town’s scenic streets and has been the subject of many postcards.

For motorised traffic it is a road to nowhere but, for the pedestrian it connects the old town hall in Market Square with the parish church, St Mary’s, and beyond. Footpaths, known locally as ‘twittens’ provide links to The Forum and to Denne Road

It is densely packed with buildings of historic interest, parts of which date back more than 600 years, most of them listed by English Heritage. Appropriately the Horsham Museum occupies one of the older properties. The 20th century is poorly represented with only one building fronting the avenue. Already there are three houses built in the 21st century, depriving the Vicarage of its garden, and that is about all there is room for.

In 1965 Ian Nairn said of the Causeway, capitalisation, punctuation and italics as per the original script:

This is the hidden, secluded part of Horsham, completely screened from the shops, leading down to the church. As an anthology of cosy Wealden buildings it would be hard to beat. Funnel-shaped, planted with lime trees in 1940 to replace an avenue which became diseased. These are already delightfully leafy. It begins on the l. with the HORSHAM MUSEUM, a big half-timbered house, c.1600 by the details on the gable, a rarity (and something of a relief) in Sussex. Opposite this is MANOR HOUSE, a design of 1704 by Nathaniel Tredgold, as blank as the other Georgian houses in Horsham. Seven bays, three stories, a pediment and quoins. Nice stables on the garden side.

On the l. side No. 12 is an old cottage light-heartedly done up about 1870. Beside it, a narrow passage called MORTHS GARDENS gives a glimpse of astonishing garden structures like small signal boxes, put up at the same time. Beyond that two very pretty early C19 cottages, one of them (REGENCY COTTAGE) with an ordinary brick front transformed by being built on a very slight segmental curve.

Back in Causeway the l. side continues very nobly with a stucco brick C18  group, Nos 13-17, all two-storey, nothing jarring yet nothing subservient. Meanwhile the other side has begun to do exactly the same thing in slightly earlier tile-hung terms with Nos 29-31. This part ends on the l. with Nos 19-20, weatherboarded fronts on a half-timbered building with the same sort of gable pendant as the Horsham Museum. A break, the street reaches the churchyard gates with the apposition, appropriately enough, of a plain C18 brick house and very pretty asymmetrical plastered cottage (FLAGSTONES), dated 1615. Beyond to the e. of the churchyard, are the depressingly genteel rebuilt ST MARY’S ALMSHOUSES of 1955 by Denman & Son and then the former Collyer’s School, now a PRIMARY SCHOOL. The buildings, small but vivacious, were by George Smith, 1840, and look exactly like a Jacobean railway station.

The lime trees mentioned by Nairn still line the road, these being fairly recent replacements for older trees previously planted. Lime trees were shown on a plan of the church and Causeway from 1770. At the town hall end is a garden area that is popular with those using the Register Office for weddings (2014 update; with Bill’s Restaurant taking over the old town hall the Register Office is now in Park House).

As can be seen from aerial views the road runs from the church in the south-west to the town hall in the north-east. Although the road has been established many years it is still being improved; a shortcut between Furneaux Way and the road has worn away the grass. In a pragmatic move the council have layed a York stone path; Horsham stone is readily available but can make for a slippery pavement and is best reserved for roof tiles. Many of the Causeway houses have Horsham stone roofing.

In July 2008 the Causeway became a film set for ’31 North 62 East’ featuring actress Marina Sirtis, who played Councillor Deanna Troy in ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’. Filmed by Southwater-based company Fact Not Fiction Films and with a £2m budget it is a fictional psychological thriller about an SAS veteran seeking justice after being betrayed by the government.

There is a mix of residential and business occupancy in the Causeway. Three separate Dental Practices and the aforementioned museum are at the old town hall end. Further down, on the north side, the Manor’s barn was given over to the church to use when the school closed. The manor house known as the Manor of Hewells was, until recently, the headquarters of the RSPCA. Since 2003 it has reverted to residential use and has the address of The Manor House. The additional properties to the rear are not part of the Causeway; their address is Hewells Court, Blackhorse Way.

And so to the properties. As one might expect, the house numbers are a little intermittent with some numbers missing where two properties have merged and some As and Bs where larger properties have divided or where infill has taken place.

The list below shows the properties in house number order, beginning at 5 which is the lowest number. Where English Heritage has listed the property their listing description is provided, as is a link to the Images of England site. Further information on previous residents and house sale prices has been included for some entries.

view down the Causeway
view up the Causeway toward the Old Town Hall

The properties are listed as you will find them when you walk down the left hand side of the road starting at the properties at the back of the old town hall then back up the other side finishing up at the manor.

5 & 6, Causeway

98u
Nos 5 (left) and 6 (right) Causeway

Number 5 is to the left of the picture with no 6 in the centre, currently painted pale blue. The building to the right was until 2013 the West Sussex County Times offices and has a Market Square address. The buildings are interesting enough to merit their own Hidden Horsham page one day; intriguing in their tall slim design with attention paid to architectural detail. These two properties have perhaps the best view down the Causeway.

 

7 and 8, Causeway

During World War I, the Great War, this property was the home of the Horsham War Hospital Supply Depot; a commemorative plaque is on the wall and it states:

In honour of the Patriotic Women of the Horsham War Hospital Supply Depot who worked in this house during the Great War 1914- 1918

Ladies of the town packed up medical supplies to be sent out to the continent. It was converted to offices in 1956 then to the dentist in 1985.

The bay window has been removed but evidence of it, and the sloping roof for it, are still visible.

Number 7 is the top picture followed by no 8. The third picture is of the plaque seen on the wall of no 8.

English Heritage: Early C19, altered later. 2 storeys and attic. Red brick. Modillion eaves cornice. 3 dormers facing west and 1 facing north. 4 windows facing west and 1 to the north. Bay window on 1st floor of north wing, now supported on brick pillars. Windows mostly triplets having a centre light with segmental head. All sash windows, glazing bars intact. No 8 has a 6-panel door with rectangular fanlight. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important, group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

Horsham Museum 9, Causeway [II*]

98e
Horsham Library, No 9 Causeway

The main section of this is C16th and the extension on the right hand side is C19th

This has been the home of Horsham Museum since 1941, moving from its previous home in Park House where it had been since 1928. The museum, originally run by the Horsham Museum Society, was given over to the town council in 1966. In 2005 the entrance was converted to create better access for disabled users. The room at the front left is available for weddings and civil partnerships (2014: not sure if this is still the case now that the Old Town Hall is a restaurant).

The Tourist Information Centre shares this address.

English Heritage: Formerly called Causeway House. C16 timber-framed house with plastered front and 1st and 2nd floors overhanging on moulded bressumers and carved brackets. Above the 2nd there is a further overhang of 2 gables with moulded bressumers, bargeboards, carved brackets and pendants. Tiled roof (once Horsham slabs). 3 storeys. 2 windows. Sash windows inserted in C18 (glazing bars intact) when 2 small bay windows of 5 and 3 lights were also added on ground floor and 1st floor, and lunette windows inserted in dormers. 6-panel door with moulded surround. C19 addition of 2 storeys and 2 windows to south. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

Visit Horsham: Tourist Information Centre.

Causeway Lodge 10, the Causeway

Causeway Lodge
Causeway Lodge, No 10 Causeway

This property was converted to create a flat on the top floor in 1969. The lower floor operated as a dental practice until 2005 when it was converted back to residential use.

English Heritage: Causeway lodge GV II House. Probably built between 1665 and 1672 and refronted and altered internally c1720. Timberframed on random stone plinth with plastered front and Horsham slab roof with wide eaves and off central brick chimneystack set behind ridge. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows and 1 dormer. Windows are 12-pane sashes in reveals with keystones over. Central doorcase with pilasters, flat hood over and 8-panel moulded door. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

Nos 11 and 12. 2 summer houses in garden to rear of no 11, Causeway

Captain Thomas Honywood, amateur photographer and Captain of Horsham Volunteer Fire Brigade lived at this address in the 1850s.

On the adjoining wall with no 13 is an alleyway which runs under / through this property, past Morth Gardens, into Denne Road. If you look over the garden wall you will see the tops of the two listed summerhouses.

English Heritage: Numbers 11 and 12, 17.3:52 including attached wall to number 11 and Summerhouse In garden of number 11 GV II Built as two separate houses, later united and currently two properties. The rear range ( part of no 11) is a 3 bay former open hall house of c1500 and the right hand part of the front range (no 12) a house of c1650 with crosswing and cellar combined with the rear range c1770,linked with an C18 framed building possibly a cloth store (part of no 11) and refurbished c1890 and c1968. The whole now forms an L-shape. Timber framed building with close-studding with jetty visible at the front of no 12, no 11 weatherboarded on the first floor and stuccoed on the ground floor. Rear elevation hung with two courses of alternate plain and pointed tiles. Horsham stone slab roof with C17 ribbed brick chimneystack to no 11 and C19 brick chimneystack to no 12. Two storeys and attics to south; 3 windows. Front has mostly C18 12-pane sashes with one tripartite sash and two storey canted bay to south. Three gables, south gable projecting, with moulded bargeboards. No 12 has half-glazed door and no 11 4-panelled door flanked by sidelights. C20 garage doors to no 11. Rear elevation has fretted bargeboards and late C19 windows with some square bays. Some original glass survives. Attached C19 brick wall to no 12 along Morth Gardens has at the top C19 decorative ironwork with elaborate intertwined foliage. No 11 has central open fireplace with bressumer of c1650, preserved wattle and daub panel, a fireplace to the rear of 1770 with smoke-blackened rafters above former open hall.

Potting sheds and gazebos.

Two linked summerhouses, the western one probably c1885 and the eastern c1780 in Picturesque Gothic style, originally linked by greenhouses and acting as combined gazebos and potting sheds. Western building of one storey and attics hung with alternate two courses of plain brown tiles and curved red tiles identical to rear of no 12. Tiled roof, also in alternate bands of plain and curved tiles with one brick chimneystack. Right side projecting gable with fretted bargeboards with finial and pendant, oculus to attic, three pointed arched windows and one pointed arched doorcase with half-glazed door. This linked by a brick wall to a taller narrower eastern building of red brick with some grey headers to the side elevation and polychrome brick dressings. Tiled roof with alternate courses of plain and curved tiles. Two storeys; 2 windows. Gable with fretted bargeboards, finial and pendant and blank oculus. Joined pivoting casements to first floor. Ground floor has lancets and central plank door. Unusually elaborate dual purpose garden buildings. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

13, Causeway (divided into 13 and 13A)

13 and 13a Causeway
13 and 13a Causeway

This was valued at £655,000 in May 2005

English Heritage: C18. 2 storeys. 5 windows. Plastered. Dentilled eaves cornice. Tiled roof. 2 bays of 3 lights each on both floors. Sashes, glazing bars intact. Doorway with Doric columns and pediment at the right-hand side of the house, probably moved from the centre. Another similar door to left side. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

14, Causeway

No 14 Causeway
No 14 Causeway

English Heritage: Early C18. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 1 dormer. Red brick. Eaves cornice. Horsham slab roof. 1st floor windows with segmental heads. Sashes, glazing bars intact. Wide glazing bars to ground floor windows. Doorway in frame with flat hood over supported on brackets, and 5-panel moulded door with upper 3 panels cut away for glazing. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

15, Causeway

15 Causeway
15 Causeway

This building’s firemark can be seen at first floor level under the right hand side of the left hand gable, painted white.

English Heritage: Timber-framed house refronted in early C18 but retaining 2 gables with moulded bargeboards from the old house. 2 storeys. 5 windows. Red brick on a stone plinth, the gables hung with tiles. Horsham slab roof. Moulded eaves cornice. Windows with segmental heads. Sashes, with wide glazing bars intact. Doorway in frame up 2 steps, with handrail and pediment over. 6-panel moulded door. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

16, Causeway

No 16 Causeway
No 16 Causeway

English Heritage: C18 front, but probably refaced like the last house, as it has a C17 brick chimney-stack. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Red brick. Eaves cornice. Horsham slab roof. Segmental-headed windows with sashes, glazing bars missing. 6-panel moulded door with hood over. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

17, Causeway

17 Causeway
17 Causeway

This building’s firemark can be seen at first floor level above the front door, painted white.

English Heritage: C18. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. Red brick. Moulded wooden cornice. Brick parapet. 2 bay windows on both floors, the ground floor ones containing casement windows, the 1st floor ones sashes with glazing bars intact. 6-panel moulded door with broken curved pediment over supported on brackets. Modern addition to south-east with original red brick wall with stone cappings in front. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

17A and 17B, Causeway

17a and 17b Causeway
17a and 17b Causeway

Not listed: Granted planning permission in 1995 this part of no 17 was later that was converted into two dwellings with individual gated entrances into their courtyards. It can be seen from the brickwork that there was originally a vehicle-width entrance where 17A’s gate is today.

18, Causeway

18 Causeway
18 Causeway

This was the home of author Hammond Innes during his childhood in the 1920s; there is a blue plaque there to commemorate this. Many years earlier it was the home of Sir Timothy Shelley, father of local poet Percy Bysshe Shelley

English Heritage: Timber-framed house with an entirely C19 brick front. The timber-framing is visible in the side walls. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. Small bay in front through both floors. Segmental heads to windows. Casements with small leaded panes. C18 6-panel moulded door. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

19 and 20, Causeway

19 and 20 Causeway
19 and 20 Causeway

No 19 is available for film crews to live in and shoot films in. It is catalogued by Georgian Locations; for interior and garden photographs. In September 2006 no 19 was for sale at £350,000.

The properties ‘overlap’ with no 20 having upper floor rooms over the top of no 19, operated under a ‘flying lease’ for maintenance purposes.

English Heritage: Originally one house, now divided into two. C16 timber-framed house now fronted with painted brick on ground floor and weather-boarding above. 2 storeys. 3 windows. The 1st floor was originally jettied but has been under-built. Gable in the centre of the front with moulded bargeboards and pendant. Some casement windows (one original). Some sash windows (glazing bars intact). The timber-framing is visible in the side walls which both have gables, the north one with scalloped bargeboards. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

The Vicarage, Causeway

The Vicarage, Causeway
The Vicarage, Causeway

Not listed: The vicarage dates from around 1840 when its predecessor was demolished. The new vicarage was funded by Queen Anne’s Bounty and is built in the Tudor style from sandstone. Queen Anne’s Bounty was a fund established in 1704 by act of parliament to augment the income of the poorer clergy.

21, 22 & 23 (Vicarage Garden Properties), Causeway

21, 22 and 23left to right (Vicarage Garden Properties), Causeway
21, 22 and 23 left to right (Vicarage Garden Properties), Causeway

Not listed: modern properties built in the Vicarage garden in the space between the Vicarage and the Parish Church. In the autumn of 2007 these properties were being marketed for £735,000, £773,000 and £695,000 respectively. They were sold long before the building works were completed; perhaps reflecting the attraction of the last new properties to be built on open space in the Causeway. The three properties have features representing the current environmental concerns of the age including solar heating panels as part of the original build.

It is curious that the three houses take up the gap in numbering between no 20 built in the 16th century and no 24 across the road built in the 14th century.

Parish Church of St Mary, Causeway [I]

Parish Church of St Mary, Causeway [I]
Parish Church of St Mary, Causeway [I]
This is the view from Normandy in 2006 (unlike all of the other pictures taken in March 2009). It is not possible to get a good view of the whole church from the Causeway. Surprisingly, for such an important and detailed building, English Heritage has very little to say about it – and the Horsham Photographer has yet to take on the project.

A selection of photographs of most of the places of worship in Horsham is on this post.

English Heritage: Large C13 church, heavily restored by Teulon. Tall shingled spire to west tower. The Vestry, called the Lollards’ Tower, at north-east corner, is C15. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

Highways & Byways in Sussex, by E.V. Lucas

The church of St. Mary, which rises majestically at the end of the Causeway, has a slender shingled spire that reaches a great height—not altogether, however, without indecision. There is probably an altitude beyond which shingles are a mistake: they are better suited to the more modest spire of the small village.

The church is remarkable also for length of roof (well covered with Horsham stone), and it is altogether a singularly commanding structure. Within is an imposing plainness. The stone effigy of a knight in armour reclines just to the south of the altar: son of a branch of the Braose family—of Chesworth, hard by, now in ruins—of whose parent stock we shall hear more when we reach Bramber. The knight, Thomas, Lord Braose, died in 1395. The youth of Horsham, hostile invincibly, like all boys, to the stone nose, have reduced that feature to the level of the face; or was it the work of the Puritans, who are known to have shared in the nasal objection?

South of the churchyard is the river, from the banks of which the church would seem to be all Horsham, so effectually is the town behind it blotted out by its broad back. On the edge of the churchyard is perhaps the smallest house in Sussex: certainly the smallest to combine Gothic windows with the sale of ginger-beer.

24-26, Causeway

From the picture on English Heritage it looks like one house but there are two more cottages tucked down the left hand side, these being nos 24 on the left and 25 in the centre of the first photograph. The second view is of no 26 as viewed from the Causeway.

The 1881 census records a William Frederick Adkin living at no 26, he was a groom and gardener.

English Heritage: Dated 1615. Originally one house, now 3 cottages. Timber-framed house with plastered front, the ground floor rebuilt in brick (plastered). The upper floor is partly tile-hung towards churchyard. The house consisted of a recessed centre and 2 projecting wings of which the 1st floor overhung on moulded bressumers, but the south wing has been underbuilt and the north wing altered to make a shed with doors on ground floor. The wings are gabled with scalloped bargeboards (renewed). In the centre is a 3rd small gable above a dormer window. Horsham slab roof. 2 storeys and attics in centre and north gable. 4 windows. All the windows are modern casements, with the exception of the attic window in the centre gable which is original. The Manor House, Stables to the south and Nos 24 to 31 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 to 7 (odd) Blackhorse Way and with all the listed buildings in South Street. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

Chantry House, 27 Causeway

Chantry House, 27 Causeway
Chantry House, 27 Causeway

Once occupied by Sir Henry Shawcross who was the prosecutor for the crown at the trial of the Acid Bath Murderer John George Haigh. Co-incidentally Haigh was held in cell 2 at the Barttelot Road Police Station when he was committed for Crown Court trial at Horsham Town Hall. The cell doors are now at the Horsham Museum just across the road.

This property has an extensive rear garden as can be seen from aerial views. In 2004 an application was made to erect four large houses, three with five bedrooms and one with four. The access road would be where the garage is today. The application was rejected on the grounds that it was an ‘inappropriate, unacceptable development of this sensitive site within the Horsham Conservation Area’.

English Heritage: Early to mid C18. 2 storeys. 7 windows. Red brick. Moulded eaves cornice. Hipped roof of Horsham slabs. Sash windows, glazing bars missing. 6-panel moulded door in frame with pediment over. Wrought-iron gate between brick piers supporting spherical caps. The Manor House, Stables to the south and Nos 24 to 31 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 to 7 (odd) Blackhorse Way and with all the listed buildings in South Street. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

Ottleys Causeway

Ottleys, Causeway
Ottleys, Causeway

Not listed: Formerly the parish room and used for a playgroup but sold and converted to residential use in 2001.

The property is known by its name and sits between the Chantry House, no 27 and Bishops Court at 27A.

Bishops Court 27A Causeway

Bishops Court 27A, Causeway
Bishops Court 27A, Causeway

Not listed: A small group of 6 apartments that appear to have been built in the late 1980s following a number of unsuccessful planning attempts to build on the site. The two bedroomed flats were selling a little under £200,000 before the credit crunch of 2008/9.

28, Causeway

28, Causeway
28, Causeway

This Georgian property was owned by Horsham’s former MP Sir Peter Horden in 2001. He caused controversy by seeking planning permission for a two storey extension at the rear. By the end of the year permission for a single storey extension was granted

English Heritage: Late C18 or early c19. 3 storeys. 3 windows. Formerly stuccoed now refaced in modern brick. Eaves cornice. Windows with segmental heads. Sashes, glazing bars intact. Hood over door supported on brackets. The Manor House, Stables to the south and Nos 24 to 31 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 to 7 (odd) Blackhorse Way and with all the listed buildings in South Street. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

The Minstrels, 29 and 30 Causeway

The Minstrels, 29 and 30 Causeway
The Minstrels, 29 and 30 Causeway

English Heritage: This was previously timber-framed cottages, but in modern times has been converted into two houses and refronted with red brick on the ground floor and tiles above. The overhang of the 1st floor on curved brackets and the Horsham slab roof of the old house have been preserved. 2 gables. 2 storeys. 7 windows. All windows modern casements with diamond leaded lights. The Manor House, Stables to the south and Nos 24 to 31 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 to 7 (odd) Blackhorse Way and with all the listed buildings in South Street. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

31, Causeway (and 33)

31, Causeway (and 33)
31, Causeway (and 33)

English Heritage: C18. 2 storeys. 4 windows. Ground floor stuccoed, above tile-hung. The southernmost window bay is of painted brick. Moulded eaves cornice. Horsham slab roof. 2 bays on both floors. Sash windows, glazing bars missing. 6-panel moulded door in frame with flat hood over supported on carved brackets. The Manor House, Stables to the south and Nos 24 to 31 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 to 7 (odd) Blackhorse Way and with all the listed buildings in South Street. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

‘the Barn’ Former stables to south of Manor house, Causeway

'The Barn' Former stables to south of Manor house, Causeway
‘The Barn’
Former stables to south of Manor house, Causeway

English Heritage: This stable building, adjoining No 31 The Causeway, has been converted into a chapel. Red brick with some grey headers. Projecting centre portion with pediment over. Most of the original windows have been blocked up and modern round-headed windows inserted. The Manor House, Stables to the south and Nos 24 to 31 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 to 7 (odd) Blackhorse Way and with all the listed buildings in South Street. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

The Manor House, Causeway [II*] now 8 apartments

The Manor House, Causeway [II*]
The Manor House, Causeway [II*]
This is already the subject of a post on this site, this photograph was taken in October 2008. In the winter of 2013/14 some of the large trees came down in the wind opening up the views from the Causeway.

English Heritage: Large house to a design of 1704 by Nathaniel Tredgold. 3 storeys. 7 window. Red brick, at one time cemented. Centre portion of 3 windows projects slightly and has a pediment over. Long and short stuccoed quoins to outer ends of this centre portion and of the wings. Stuccoed stringcourses above ground and 1st floors, and keystones above windows. Modillion eaves cornice. Hipped roof of Horsham slabs. Glazing bars missing from lower half of ground and 1st floor windows. C19 brick porch. Large C19 addition to north and modern addition to south. The house has 2 contemporary stable buildings. The Manor House, Stables to the south and Nos 24 to 31 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 to 7 (odd) Blackhorse Way and with all the listed buildings in South Street. All the listed buildings in The Causeway form a very important group with all the listed buildings in Market Square and with South Street.

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